Back to School 2017

Junior Achievement USA Surveys of Parents and Teens Show Cost of School Supplies Presents a Financial Challenge for Most Families

78 Percent of Parents Plan to Buy Back-To-School Supplies at Brick-and-Mortar Stores; Only 8 Percent will Shop Online

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A new survey from Junior Achievement USA (JA) shows that 78 percent of parents plan to buy their children’s back-to-school supplies at traditional retail outlets this year, with only 8 percent planning to do so online, and 13 percent responding “don’t know/not applicable.” In all, 60 percent of parents say that it is a challenge to afford school supplies, while 57 percent of teens say it is challenging for their parents or guardians to afford school supplies. Conversely, 40 percent of parents and 43 percent of teens say affording school supplies is not a challenge. The survey of 1,204 parents of school-aged children and 1,000 teens was conducted by ORC International for JA.

afford school supplies

In all, 64 percent of parents expect to pay less than $500 per child on back-to-school items (clothes and school supplies), while 72 percent of teens expect their parents or guardians to pay less than $500.

school supplies

Only 17 percent of parents and 16 percent of teens expect that more than $500 will be paid, per-child, for school supplies. Parents and teens responding “do not know/not applicable” came out to 20 percent and 12 percent, respectively.

buy school supplies

When it comes to buying school supplies, 58 percent of parents plan to buy them from discount stores, while 11 percent plan to buy from department stores. Office supply stores (5%), warehouse clubs (3%) and “other stores” (1%) are also on the list of places parents and guardians plan to shop.

Methodology

This report presents the findings of ORC International’s Online and Youth CARAVAN surveys conducted among a sample of 1,204 parents of school-aged children and 1,000 13-17 year olds.  These surveys were conducted live from June 29 to July 6, 2017, for the parents’ portion and from July 11 to July 16, 2017, for the teens’ portion. Respondents for this survey are selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls.  Because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, no estimates of sampling error can be calculated.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording, and response options.

About Junior Achievement of North Florida

Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to educating students about workforce readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy through experiential, hands-on programs. Junior Achievement of North Florida has been operating in Jacksonville since 1963 and now includes a satellite office in Tallahassee. Through an innovative partnership between the business community, educators and volunteers, Junior Achievement of North Florida helps young people connect with relevant learning and the importance of staying in school. This collaboration resulted in 56,489 students reached during the 2015-2016 school year. To learn more about Junior Achievement of North Florida, visit http://www.JAjax.com.

Stay connected: Facebook // Twitter // LinkedIn // Google+ // Instagram // Website

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9th Annual ‘$mart Women Make Change!’ to benefit JA Girl$

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Save the date-9th annual SWMC

The annual $mart Women Make Change! is Junior Achievement’s signature event to benefit the JA Girl$ program. JA Girl$ has educated more than 19,000 girls and young women in financial literacy, career readiness and entrepreneurship since 2006.

The featured speaker for 2017 is Denise Johnson, group president of Caterpillar Inc. and Board member for Junior Achievement USA.

Denise follows other women in leadership who have served as keynote speaker in years past including Alex Sink, Pam Bondi, Jenna Bush Hager, Kathleen Murphy, Christina Norman, Danica Patrick, Amy DuBois Barnett, and Sonia Manzano.

Tables for the luncheon start at $1,500. Reservations can be made at www.JAjax.com.

$mart Women Make Change! is supported by a grant from the Delores Barr Weaver Forever Event Fund, est. 2015.

About JA Girl$

The mission of JA Girl$ is to provide hands-on experiences and educational opportunities that honor, value and celebrate the female perspective, experiences and unique development. The program has served more than 19,000 girls in North Florida since its inception in 2006. JA Girl$ originated in Jacksonville and has been adopted throughout 25 JA Areas in the United States and five foreign countries.

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JA Program Spotlight: JA It’s My Future

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JA It’s My Future®

Grades 6-8

STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT:

  • Career clusters, high-growth jobs, career planning, and creating a personal brand.

FOLLOWING PARTICIPATION IN THE PROGRAM, STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Explore potential careers, discover how to plan for a job, and learn how to keep it.
  • Develop personal-branding and job-hunting tools for earning a job.

Program Spotlight-blog-description-JA It's My Future

Session One: My Brand

Through interviews, self-reflection, and creation of a personal logo, students explore the importance of building a positive personal brand for the future, starting in middle school.

Session Two: Career Clusters

Students explore career clusters and identify jobs for additional research. They also recognize the value of and need for all types of jobs.

Session Three: High-Growth Careers

Students learn the four factors to consider in choosing a job, and they take a close look at some high-growth career fields.

Session Four: Career Mapping

Students explore how to use life experiences to develop work skills and how to map a path to employment goals.

Session Five: On the Hunt

Students are introduced to the basic aspects of job hunting through a scavenger hunt. Students are taught to keep all their vital job-hunting information in one place.

Session Six: How to Keep (or Lose) a Job

Students learn the difference between technical and soft skills, and they recognize the impact that their personal behavior has on their ability to succeed in a job.

JA Its My Future

Bring JA It’s My Future to your classroom!

At your invitation, we help arrange for business people and local community leaders to visit your classroom a few times or throughout the semester. Request JA It’s My Future! for your classroom today at JAjax.com.

Become a JA Volunteer!

Join Junior Achievement’s national network of more than 213,000 volunteers and help students in your community connect the dots between what they learn in school and the “business of life”— work readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy. Visit JAjax.com to learn how you can become a JA Volunteer.

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2017 Teens & Careers Survey by Junior Achievement USA

NEW RESEARCH REVEALS THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ CAREER AND COLLEGE PLANS AND AN ONGOING NEED TO ENGAGE GIRLS IN STEM

Junior Achievement & EY survey of 13-17 year olds shows teens are changing plans based on the economy; surprising 91 percent know their future field of study

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Both boys and girls ages 13-17 know what kind of job they want after they graduate from high school.

But, that’s where the similarities end according to a survey conducted by Junior Achievement and EY.

The data shows that career preferences are different when it comes to gender.

New research conducted on behalf of Junior Achievement and EY shows that a surprising 91 percent of teenage boys and girls ages 13-17 know what kind of job they want after they graduate from high school. That’s where the similarities between boys and girls end.

job after graduation

Teens today are giving a great deal of thought to their future careers, but gaps still exist between boys’ and girls’ interest in careers choice.

The data shows that career preferences remain drawn along gender lines, with more than one-third (36%) of boys pursuing careers in STEM vs. only 11 percent of girls. Twenty-six percent of girls plan to study for careers in the arts (vs. 10% of boys) and girls favor careers in the medical/dental field 24 percent to just six percent of boys.

Both boys and girls want to engage in meaningful work, yet meaning is in the eye of the beholder. For boys, fun and financial stability are essential. Girls, on the other hand, want to help people.

What appeals most to each (top three answers, ranked):

  • Boys on their dream jobs: Think it would be fun (28%), I’d be good at it (21%), I’d make a lot of money (17%)
  • Girls on their dream jobs: I would help people (25%), I’d be good at it (23%), I think it would be fun (20%)

 

appeals about dream job

Both boys and girls want to engage in meaningful work, yet meaning is in the eye of the beholder. For boys, fun and financial stability are essential. Girls, on the other hand, want to help people.

“While it’s encouraging to see teens today are giving a great deal of thought to their career aspirations, it’s surprising to learn that there are still significant gaps between boys’ and girls’ interest in careers choice. We hoped to learn that girls, for example, would be more attracted to STEM careers beyond medicine – related to science, engineering, computers and math – since there is virtually unlimited opportunity for talented and qualified professionals in these fields,” said Steve St. Amand, president of Junior Achievement of North Florida. “Our research shows that one-in-five JA alumni works in the same field as the JA volunteer mentor they had in school. Because role models are critically important, we are placing greater emphasis on getting STEM professionals to volunteer for JA classes.”

 

Students Know Money Matters

Personal or family economics and the status of jobs in America are changing 52 percent of students’ college plans. Teens’ altered plans include, for example, expecting to work and go to college at the same time or to attend a less expensive state school or community college. And, 85 percent of teens expect to pay for some or all of their education, whether through loans, scholarships or jobs.

Knowing this, it is surprising that while about three-fourths (73%) of teens’ high schools offer resources to help kids understand the costs of school and training, only one in three (33%) of students takes advantage of those programs.

 

From Passion to Preparedness

The workplace aspirations that influence boys’ and girls’ choice of career also differ:

  1. Ability to have a meaningful career and a family (52% of girls vs. 46% of boys)
  2. Ability to do something meaningful for the community/society (45% of girls vs. 33% of boys)
  3. Flexibility in work schedule/location (39% of boys vs. 36% of girls)
  4. Professional advancement to become a leader/expert (29% of boys vs. 23% of girls)

 

Virtually all teens picture a conventional route to their dream job: accepting paid/unpaid internships, volunteering for like-minded organizations or starting out in a related field. However, boys prioritize wanting to gain technology skills, while girls expect relationship building and teamwork to help them most in the workplace.

influence in career

Parents, society/pop culture, and class/teacher are the top three influences for teens and career choices.

The skills teens want to learn to prepare for their dream jobs includes technology skills (54% boys vs. 27% girls), relationship building and collaboration (50% girls vs. 31% boys), speaking and giving presentations (39%), analytical/critical thinking (34%), business knowledge (26%) and writing (16%).

“The research findings around gender differences related to career skills and workplace aspirations further validate the importance of building a supportive and inclusive culture where diverse thinking and experiences are not only encouraged, but valued as we introduce the next generation of purpose-driven workers into the workforce,” said Gary Kozlowski, Partner, Ernst & Young LLP, who leads a network of EY leaders serving on more than 40 local JA boards across the US, Canada and the Caribbean. “It is a privilege to work with JA USA to mobilize EY professionals to serve as mentors in schools and classrooms. Our colleagues appreciate the opportunity to give back and support JA’s mission of fostering financial literacy, entrepreneurship and work readiness skills – a meaningful way for EY to demonstrate our commitment of building a better working world.”

Other Data Points

  • Only nine percent of boys and girls aspire to start their own business.
  • Only seven percent of boys and girls have chosen to work in public service.
  • The three top influences on career choices are parents and societal influences/TV/media, followed by a class or teacher.
  • In this survey, careers in STEM were further defined as scientist, researcher, computer programmer, engineer, physicist.
  • In this survey, careers in the medical/dental field were further defined as doctor, nurse, veterinarian, dentist, physical therapist.
  • In this survey, careers in the arts were further defined as musician, actor, artist, writer.

 

Methodology

This report presents the findings of ORC International’s Youth CARAVAN survey conducted among a sample of 1,000 13-17 year olds.  This survey was live from February 28 to March 5, 2017.

Respondents for this survey are selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls.  Because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, no estimates of sampling error can be calculated.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options.

 

About Junior Achievement USA®

(JA) Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers, and provide relevant, hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship. Today, JA reaches more than 4.8 million students per year in 109 markets across the United States, with an additional 5.8 million students served by operations in 100 other countries worldwide. Junior Achievement USA is a member of JA Worldwide. Visit http://www.ja.org for more information.

About EY

EY is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. The insights and quality services we deliver help build trust and confidence in the capital markets and in economies the world over. We develop outstanding leaders who team to deliver on our promises to all of our stakeholders. In so doing, we play a critical role in building a better working world for our people, for our clients and for our communities.   EY refers to the global organization, and may refer to one or more, of the member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, each of which is a separate legal entity. Ernst & Young Global Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, does not provide services to clients. For more information about our organization, please visit ey.com.   This news release has been issued by Ernst & Young LLP, a member firm of EY serving clients in the US.

 

JA Program Spotlight: JA Be Entrepreneurial

JA Program Spotlight - JA Be Entrepreneurial

JA Be Entrepreneurial®

Grades 9-12

Students learn about:

  • Advertising, competitive advantages, financing, marketing, and product development

Following participation in the program, students will be able to:

  • Recognize characteristics and practices of successful entrepreneurs.
  • Evaluate an entrepreneurial idea based on product, customer, and
    competitive-advantage criteria.
  • Demonstrate business-planning skills for venture start-up, marketing,
    financing, management, and ethical decision-making.

Program Spotlight-blog-description-JA Be Entrepreneurial

Session One: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Students are introduced to the elements of successful business start-ups, myths and facts about entrepreneurship, and participate in a product development competition.

Session Two: What’s My Business?

Students take on the roles of various entrepreneurs as they develop their product or service idea, and analyze sources of successful entrepreneurial ventures to select a product or service as the basis of their business plan.

Session Three: Who’s My Customer?

Student groups create and present advertisements to demonstrate how market needs and demographics contribute to successful entrepreneurial ventures.

Session Four: What’s My Advantage?

Students evaluate actual companies that have excelled in selecting and applying successful competitive advantages.

Session Five: Competitive Advantages

Students play a game that demonstrates effective competitive advantages and select the best for their own entrepreneurial venture.

Session Six: Ethics Are Good For Business

Students learn through case-studies how being ethical is good for business in the long run.

Session Seven: The Business Plan

Students apply the key elements of successful entrepreneurs to their product or services and complete a sample business plan.

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Bring JA Be Entrepreneurial to your classroom!

At your invitation, we help arrange for business people and local community leaders to visit your classroom a few times or throughout the semester. Request JA Be Entrepreneurial for your classroom today at JAjax.com.

Become a JA Volunteer!

Join Junior Achievement’s national network of more than 213,000 volunteers and help students in your community connect the dots between what they learn in school and the “business of life”— work readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy. Visit JAjax.com to learn how you can become a JA Volunteer.

Stay connected: Facebook // Twitter // LinkedIn // Google+ // Instagram // Website

 

JA Boy$ Spring Reverse Job Shadow

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In partnership with our JA Boy$ program, a Reverse Job Shadow event was held at Young Men’s Leadership Academy on May 25.

This Spring event put a cap on a successful year for JA Boy$ that included Job Shadow trips to Sally Corporation, the Federal Reserve Bank, and Florida Blue.

Thank you volunteers!
-Tony Allegretti, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville
-Devin Coleman, Community Activist, Poet & Author
-Obi Umunna, Umunna Legal Group
-Trey Carmichael, Northwestern Mutual
-Adama Diallo, Florida Blue
-Papis Diouf, Yardi

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About JA Boy$

JA Boy$ serves as a bridge between JA’s real-world programs and all-male classroom environment. For more info on this program and how to get involved, click here.

Stay connected: Facebook // Twitter // LinkedIn // Google+ // Instagram // Website

Program Spotlight: JA Our Nation

JA Program Spotlight - JA Our Nation

JA Our Nation®

5th Grade

Students learn about:

  • The nation’s free market system and how it serves as an economic engine for businesses and careers.
  • The need for entrepreneurial and innovative thinking to meet the requirements of high-growth, high-demand careers and the concept of globalization in business.

Following participation in the program, students will be able to:

  • Identify the characteristics of a free market economy.
  • Define entrepreneurship and explore the process of innovation.
  • Understand that businesses need people with technical skills to support
    high-growth, high-demand jobs.
  • Compare career clusters.
  • Explore how the United States is tied to the global economy.

Program Spotlight-blog-description-JA Our Nation

Session One: Free to Choose Your Work or Business

Students are introduced to the nation’s free market system and how it supports businesses and careers.

Session Two: Innovation Nation

Students experience how entrepreneurial thinking can spur new businesses and the opportunity for future income. A wristband directs students to an online playable that explores STEM careers and skills.

Session Three: Career Clusters

Students examine career groups and the skills needed for a variety of careers.

Session Four: Get and Keep the Job!

Students identify important work-readiness soft skills necessary for career success.

Session Five: Global Connections

Students explore how the United States is connected to the global economy.

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Bring JA Our Nation to your classroom!

At your invitation, we help arrange for business people and local community leaders to visit your classroom a few times or throughout the semester. Request JA Our Nation for your classroom today at JAjax.com.

Become a JA Volunteer!

Join Junior Achievement’s national network of more than 213,000 volunteers and help students in your community connect the dots between what they learn in school and the “business of life”— work readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy. Visit JAjax.com to learn how you can become a JA Volunteer.

Stay connected: Facebook // Twitter // LinkedIn // Google+ // Instagram // Website

IberiaBank volunteer completes JA program at Hogan Spring Glen Elementary

This spring semester Tanya Guydos, Vice President of Iberiabank in Jacksonville, spent time each week teaching a kindergarten class at Hogan Spring Glen Elementary. She volunteered to teach the Junior Achievement program, JA Ourselves, and shared her experiences with JA program director Melissa Covey throughout the Spring.

February 2017

IberiaBank Volunteer

“Today we did the voting  lesson and I was able to get the Supervisor of Elections office to donate I voted stickers, I registered stickers, ballots and other items for them as well. We all “voted” on doing a beautification project for their class and their home.  I brought in all the goodies to make flowers pots.  One of our clients graciously donated all of the seeds and we had a ball.  Ok…   we did have to watch the dirt, I would have hated to call the janitor!

Thought I would share with you. Great Friday and such a wonderful group of kids!!”

April 2017

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“They were so excited that I was back and look at the card they made for me for my time I had spent with them!  I about started to cry!”

May 2017

Tanya Guydos Iberia Bank Hogan Spring Glen

“Today each child received their certificates AND a nickel and a quarter (Lesson #4) to put in their banks to save!” 

About JA Ourselves®

JA Ourselves uses storybook characters in read-aloud and hands-on activities to introduce the role people play in an economy. Through engaging, volunteer-led activities, young students learn about individual choices, money, the importance of saving and giving, and the value of work. Learn more about JA Ourselves.

If you are interested in becoming a Junior Achievement volunteer please visit JAjax.com.

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Sandalwood High School students win FedEx Junior Business Challenge at THE PLAYERS Championship

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge

Student company “Antibee” will advance to the business challenge finals at the TOUR Championship in Atlanta

On Wednesday, May 10 THE PLAYERS Championship hosted the second FedEx Junior Business Challenge qualifying event of the season, as students from Junior Achievement of North Florida presented business concepts to a panel consisting of 2014 FedExCup champion Billy Horschel and successful business personalities for a chance to advance to the FedEx Junior Business Challenge Finals at the TOUR Championship in Atlanta.

FedEx Junior Business Challenge

The competition consisted of three student-run companies:

  • team Antibee from Sandalwood High School,
  • team Lil Patriots from A. Philip Randolph Academies of Technology,
  • and team Wolfpack Snack Shack from Samuel L. Wolfson High.

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge

The companies presented their business to a panel of judges and an audience inside the Stadium Village alongside the 18th fairway during THE PLAYERS Championship.

The guest panel of judges featured:

  • Billy Horschel – 2014 FedEx Cup Champion
  • Kristi Dosh – Sports business writer, Forbes
  • Tripp Davis – Managing partner, PwC Florida
  • Mary Lynn Schroeder – CEO/Lead Designer, In Blue Handmade

In the end, Sandalwood’s Antibee won the judges over. Antibee aims to increase awareness of bullying within schools; a real problem, according to the company, that no one wants to talk about for fear of embarrassment and/or retaliation. As a solution the students created an app that can be downloaded on Apple or Android devices. The app allows students to share positive messages, look for resources,  and connect with other students who have experienced bullying or who might just want to offer up encouragement and positivity.

Their win at THE PLAYERS Championship means they advance to the FedEx Junior Business Challenge Finals at the TOUR Championship in Atlanta.

 

All teams presenting at the FedEx Junior Business Challenge are participants in the JA Company Program, a Junior Achievement program in which students learn to be entrepreneurial-minded when they create their business from scratch and try to make a profit.

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge, an extension of the JA Company Program, serves as a platform to provide select JA students the opportunity to showcase their business concepts at designated PGA TOUR tournaments this season for a chance to generate a $75,000 donation from FedEx to further support youth entrepreneurship.

View more photos from the event.

The FedEx Junior Business Challenge

About Junior Achievement of North Florida

Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to educating students about workforce readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy through experiential, hands-on programs. Junior Achievement of North Florida has been operating in Jacksonville since 1963 and now includes a satellite office in Tallahassee. Through an innovative partnership between the business community, educators and volunteers, Junior Achievement of North Florida helps young people connect with relevant learning and the importance of staying in school. This collaboration resulted in 56,489 students reached during the 2015-2016 school year. To learn more about Junior Achievement of North Florida, visit http://www.JAjax.com.

About JA Company Program

JA Company Program is Junior Achievement’s longest running program. It is a blended learning approach that offers groups of students the opportunity to understand the steps involved in launching their own businesses while learning the basics of entrepreneurship, financial literacy and business success. Learn more about JA Company Program.

Students gain “Skills to Achieve” at Macquarie Group

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Lee High School students participated in JA’s “Skills to Achieve” program at Macquarie Group’s Jacksonville office.

The students learned what skills are necessary to work at Macquarie Group and succeed in the finance industry. Company volunteers taught Junior Achievement lessons that further discussed tools and skills required to earn and keep a job in high-growth career industries.

Thank you Macquarie volunteers!

-Anthony Glenn
-Gerrylyn Williams
-Kisha Shabazz
-Renaire Le Blanc
-Nasr Jeries
-Claudio Ghipsmann

SKILLS TO ACHIEVE

Skills to Achieve brings high school students to a company location for a stimulating, interactive, and impactful one-day experience. The day begins with a host company experience and continues with corporate volunteers team teaching JA lessons on financial literacy and workforce readiness.

To learn more about JA programs in North Florida, visit JAjax.com.

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